Recipes

Ingredients 1/2 a chopped mango 2 shots of cachaça 1 tablespoon of sugar 1 finger pepper in strips (deseeded) Method: Place the mango in the bottom of the glass, along with the pepper and the sugar. Muddle lightly. Add the cachaça and stir until the sugar dissolves. Fill the glass with the crushed ice.

Share.

Ingredients 1 shot of cachaça 1 thick slice of pineapple, diced 1 tablespoon of sugar 1 thin slice of ginger with peel Mint leaves to taste 1 bouquet of mint (small, for decoration) 30 ml of orange syrup Method: In a glass, place the chopped pineapple, the sliced ginger, the sugar and the mint leaves. Muddle, add the cachaça, fill the glass with ice, and finish with the orange syrup. Decorate with the mint branch.

Share.

Ingredients 1 small piece of watermelon 30 gr of chopped ginger 1 tablespoon of sugar 70 ml of cachaça Ice Method: Put the watermelon, the ginger and the sugar in the shaker. Pour the ice into the container along with the cachaça. Shake well. Decorate the edge of the glass with chilli, honey and black pepper, serve the mixture in the glass and finalize the decoration with a “dedo de moça” pepper.

Share.

Ingredients 60 ml of cachaça ½ tablespoon of sugar 2 slices of starfruit Passion fruit 2 pineapple wedges 1 pineapple ice lolly Method: Put the ice cream in the glass. In the cocktail shaker place the fruits and sugar, muddle well. Add a little ice, then the cachaça and shake. Pour into the glass with ice cream inside.

Share.

Quentão is the quintessential Festa Junina drink and can be made with cachaça or wine Quentão is a hot drink and traditionally served at a Festa Juina (June Festival) in Brazil. People often drink it through to the end of August, however, as it serves as a classic winter warmer on those chilly nights, especially in the south of the country. Quentão made with cachaça is more common in the southeast and northeast of Brazil, regions that produce significant quantities of sugarcane. The wine variety is typical of the South, home to the country’s most-prized vineyards. Quentão is so good…

Share.

The inspiration for this edition’s recipe about Brazilian gastronomy comes from the lyrics of a Roberto Carlos song. Winter in London has arrived and the urge to stay indoors under a warm blanket only increases. Casseroles, soups, tea, hot drinks and a decent drop of red wine are the order of the day, to keep the body toasty in this cold. If you have someone to help keep you warm, then you’ll both be doubly cosy with this little soup: so open a bottle of wine and throw yourself into the kitchen! The secret of this recipe is to use…

Share.

Brazilian Gastronomy: What about a “tasty” regional tour of Brazil? Let us be your guide! With over 500 years of history, Brazilian cuisine is extremely diverse, the result of a great mix of ingredients, foods and traditions that date back to both to the indigenous native population and the migratory influences over the centuries. Even the “discovery” of Brazil relates to cooking given that the Portuguese caravels that landed in the country in 1500 were in fact in search of India and its spices. Today, every region of the country has its own gastronomic identity and each local cuisine has…

Share.

The cachaça-based drink, popular in Brazil up until the end of the 1970s, is making a comeback in bars, restaurants and parties: the batida A batida is a smooth, sweet tasting drink, which can make it quite dangerous given that you hardly realise that you’re drinking cachaça! It is very simple to make. You will need the following ingredients in equal measures: cachaça, condensed milk, fruit and ice. These ingredients are placed into a blender and mixed until the drink reaches a smooth consistency. The practical side of the drink is that you can make it in large quantities, for…

Share.