Education

The Embassy of Brazil in London will host an unprecedented meeting about the history of the CIEPs (Integrated Centres of Public Education) of the 1980s. Brainchild of the combined intellects of the likes of Oscar Niemeyer, Darcy Ribeiro and Leonel Brizola, the audacious project implanted in Rio de Janeiro in 1982 became an icon of architecture, inclusion and public education. The event will provide the public with the chance to find out more about the subject, thanks to a recently released book, called “Onde você encontra pessoas: as Escolas Radicais de Oscar Niemeyer, Darcy Ribeiro e Leonel Brizola” (Wherever you…

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If your dream is to study for a post-graduate diploma or an MBA abroad in the United Kingdom, then this could be your chance. Registrations for the Clevening study programme are open until 8 November, with approximately 70 places available for Brazilian students. Opportunities abound in all areas for those with the following pre-requisites; at least two years of high quality professional experience (this can include volunteer work or internships); at least ten years since completing undergraduate diploma (mid-career); an understanding of how the candidate’s chosen course will be of benefit to their home country; and an intention to return…

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Paulo Coelho’s 19th title, launched internationally in September, brings us the story of Mata Hari, who continues to capture our imagination We have no doubt about it, even if you have never read any of his books; you know who Paulo Coelho is. After all, the numbers do not lie: The Alchemist – the best-selling Brazilian book of all time – is revered as an important literary phenomenon of the 20th century. His books are in circulation in over 150 countries and have already been translated into 66 languages. He has worked as a director and playwright, journalist and composer.…

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Things are not always as they seem… and when it comes to finding the right words in a foreign language it is good to have as much information as possible to help avoid any miscommunication Despite being markedly different, English and Portuguese strangely enough share some similar roots, the result of which is evident in some of the words that appear in both languages. These common words are known as cognates. Cognates are our friends. They are words that share similar spelling and have equivalent meanings in a second language, as is the case with comédia/comedy, positivo/positive, música/music, ideia/idea and…

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In spite of its English origins, Halloween – or Dia das Bruxas (Witches Day) – is also becoming more and more popular every year in Brazil. The term “Halloween” was first used around 1745, in Scotland. The belief was that, between sunset of 31 October and dawn on 1 November, the so-called ‘hallow’, or holy, evening took place. The expression was abbreviated to Hallowe’en, and eventually took on its modern spelling: Halloween. During the 1800s, the Irish took the tradition with them to America, where it caught people’s imaginations and went on to become one of the USA’s most popular…

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This Saturday, 29 October, is going to happen an Education Fair.  A selection of British Universities will be in São Paulo to help Brazilian students choose between an array of graduate, postgraduate, master’s and doctorate degrees, as well as short-term English language courses in the UK. At this year’s event, which occurs annually and is organised by the British Council Brazil, participants can chat to representatives of Universities, see talks from industry speakers and get general information about UK Universities’ admissions process’, scholarships, English proficiency tests and much more. Among those due to attend the fair are the University of…

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Learning using books and stories. The very first Portuguese language book fair for children took place on Sunday, 25 September in Stockholm. The fair was organised by PortCast, an amazing platform for teaching Portuguese to foreign adults. When possible, I always participate with my son in these types of activities. I believe that when we raise children in a country where a language other than our own is spoken, it’s very important to take part in events that promote Portuguese. Our language is our culture, our heritage, our identity. The fair was very special since there were many Portuguese people…

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So we all know that 12 October is Children’s Day in Brazil, but did you know that it is celebrated on different days in different countries? Historically speaking, 1 June was first established as Children’s Day at the World Conference for the Well-being of Children in Geneva in 1925, the same date as the closing of the conference and signing of treaties. Naturally the same date has been adopted by many countries, such as Portugal and the US. Later, the Universal Declaration of Children’s Rights, in 1959 and the Convention on the Children’s Rights, in 1989, led the UN to…

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The proposal, based on a system already in use in Switzerland, is intended to boost the numbers of those volunteering to donate blood. Anyone whose blood is used in a transfusion which saves or helps someone in hospital will receive a text message letting them know. Blood donation is something hugely important in society and should be encouraged as much as possible. The Swiss initiative not only encourages it, but also helps to bring donors closer to those who have received their blood, whilst cultivating a spirit of charity and compassion among citizens. Mike Stredder, the NHS Director of Blood…

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Onomatopoeia: English vs Portuguese In case you didn’t know, onomatopoeia is when written language attempts to imitate sounds. Words and phonemes are used to recreate naturally occurring noises. Whilst being recreations of sounds and noises, onomatopoeias can be spelt and interpreted in different ways, depending on the language they are written in. For example, certain onomatopoeias in Portuguese and English are written differently but have the same intrinsic meanings. Have a look at these examples! Portuguese onomatopoeia: ‘Lero lero lero!’ English onomatopoeia: ‘Neener neener neener!’ Meaning: used to make fun of someone else, often used by children when they fell…

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