Recipes

Banana & Cinnamon Caipirinha Ingredients 60 ml of cachaça 1 ½ tablespoon of sugar ½ Banana Method: Put the banana and the sugar in the shaker, muddle then add the ice and the cachaça Spicy Mango Caipirinha Ingredients 1/2 a chopped mango 2 shots of cachaça 1 tablespoon of sugar 1 finger pepper in strips (deseeded) Method: Place the mango in the bottom of the glass, along with the pepper and the sugar. Muddle lightly. Add the cachaça and stir until the sugar dissolves. Fill the glass with the crushed ice.

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Mocotó is a standout Brazilian dish that continues to win over new fans Mocotó is another signature dish of Brazilian cuisine and one that is not dissimilar to feijoada. Mocotó means, quite literally, “paw of animal” and is a word that is derived from either “mukoto”, from the Quimbundo language, or “mbo-coto” from tupi. It might seem a little odd, but in fact this is precisely what the dish consists of: boiled cow’s feet served with various condiments. Alternatively the recipe can centre on some other limb or extremity, depending on the cook’s preference. A close relation to the fabled…

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Acarajé is one of the signature dishes of Brazil’s Northeast, and now you can try out this tasty delicacy by following this simple recipe Acarajé is one the most emblematic foods of Brazil’s Northeast. African in origin, it is fundamentally a patty made with beans, onion, salt and garlic, and then fried in dendê (palm) oil. It can be served with chillies, tomato sauce, vinaigrette or even shrimp, among other accompaniments. An interesting fact: acarajé is the ritual food of orixá Iansã, the ruler of the winds and storms in the Candomblé religion. In Africa, in the Yoruba language, àkàrà…

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When I heard that the theme of this edition of BBMag was “Urban Brazil”, the first thing that sprung to mind was street food In the busiest urban centres street food continues to thrive in so many ways, from street vendors selling soups out of thermos flasks to makeshift eateries set up on street corners. I always say that to truly uncover the cuisine and customs of a city or region, you first need to take a look at its street food. Every Brazilian city has its own specialty. In Pará, for example, tacacá (a soup made from the cassava…

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In keeping with this edition’s feature article about Brazilian cuisine, here is a super simple Brazilian recipe that’s easy to prepare. The tapioca crackers take a bit of patience, but they are well worth the wait. It’s also worth noting that I didn’t have to buy these ingredients in a specialist Brazilian retailer. These days it is increasingly easy to find foodstuffs from other cuisines, just hotfoot it down to any Asian or African markets or food halls and you’ll find it all. “Chuchu”, for example, is called “chow-chow” in Asian stores. The French call it chayote, and this is…

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Want to please a Brazilian? Cook shrimp. Want to please an Englishman? Cook meat. That’s what I’ve learned after 13 years of living in England. I am not a huge fan of filet mignon normally. It might be the most tender of cuts, but it lacks flavour. I personally prefer meat that’s off the bone and has a little fat. Bone, by the way, has actually become very popular. The most revered restaurants in the world now serve marrow as a delicacy. With champagne, oysters and scallops. Let’s get back a time when the only mouths hankering after marrow belonged…

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Ingredients ½ teacup of grapes, pitted and cut in halves Sugar or sweetener to taste 1 spoon (coffee) of pink pepper 50 ml of cachaça Crushed ice Method: In a glass, place the grapes, the pepper and the sugar or sweetener, and muddle everything with a pestle. Add the cachaça and the ice and mix well.

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Ingredients 2 kiwis 1 tablespoon of sugar 30 ml of cachaça 40 ml of chilled water Crushed ice Method: Blend the kiwi, sugar and chilled water. Strain. In the glass which is to be used to serve the caipirinha, muddle the other kiwi, together with the strained kiwi mix, the cachaça and the crushed ice.

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Ingredients Deseeded Watermelon cubes (to the top of the glass) 1 lemon cut into cubes (remove the pith) Sugar to taste 1 serving of cachaça Enough ice to fill the glass Method: Fill the glass with the watermelon and muddle until you release enough juice. Add the lime and sugar and continue muddling. Add the cachaça and mix with a spoon. Fill the glass with ice.

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Ingredients 1/2 large pomegranate 60 ml of cachaça 2 dessert spoons of sugar 1 lime Method: Peel the lemon (leave a little of the rind) and cut into 4 parts (remove the pith). Place the lemon wedges with the pulp facing up, add the pomegranate and sugar. Muddle well along with sugar. Add the ice and the cachaça. Garnish with pomegranate seeds on the ice.

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Ingredients 2 tangerines Sugar or sweetener to taste Ice 1 “dedo de moça” chilli pepper ½ tea cup of cachaça Method: Cut the tangerine segments into small pieces without the seeds. Put them in a glass and add the sugar / sweetener. Muddle with a pestle until the fruit releases plenty of juice. Put some oil in your hands (this will keep your hand safe from burning after handling the pepper). Cut the pepper into four parts, removing the white part and seeds from the inside. Thoroughly wash the pepper in running water. Put the ice in the glass,…

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