RIO 2016

First seen in Holland in 1956, Sitting Volleyball came about thanks to a combination of sitzball (a German sport which involved people sitting down, but no net) and athletics. Today it is played in over 50 countries. The game is played out as a best of five sets. The rules are very similar to conventional Volleyball, except for the fact that athletes must remain seated at all times, especially when they are in possession of the ball. The net which divides the court is 1.15 metres high in the men’s version and 1.05m for women. The first four sets go…

Share.

The Rio Paralympics now has the support of the most prestigious sponsor they could have ever wished for: Prince Harry made a donation to the crowdfunding campaign “#filltheseats”, which aims to raise £230,000 in order to buy 10,000 tickets to allow underprivileged children to watch the Paralympics. The British Prince, who is a regular supporter of various noble causes, is the founder of “The Invictus Games” – a series of competitions designed for soldiers who have been injured in service, which incidentally will see 11 of its members compete at the Rio Games. The value of his donation was not…

Share.

A popular feature of the Paralympics, Boccia was introduced to the format in 1984. The sport’s origin is difficult to determine, but it likely started out as an enjoyable past time in Ancient Greece or Egypt, going on to become a fully-fledged sport in Italy. The object of the Paralympic version of the game is to throw coloured balls so that they land as close as possible to a white ball, called the jack. The rules permit players to use their hands, feet, auxiliary instruments, and in the case of athletes with problems moving their limbs, third-party help can be…

Share.

Seven-a-side football has been a part of the Paralympics since 1984, and the first match of this year’s edition will be a clash between Brazil and GB. Brazil is in Group A, together with Ireland, Ukraine and Great Britain. The current champions are Russia, who defeated two-time champions Ukraine at London 2012. Even though Brazil will come up against some tough opposition, they still have a decent chance of a medal, considering that they won silver and bronze, in 2004 and 2000, respectively. 7-a-side Football is played exclusively by men’s teams with cerebral palsy. Athletes are classified into different groups,…

Share.

One of the most keenly anticipated sports at the Paralympics is the Swimming. A mainstay of the Paralympics since the Rome 1960 Games, nowadays Swimmers can have physical, intellectual or visual impediments. Pretty much identical to traditional competitions, Paralympic Swimming has four strokes: butterfly, freestyle, back and breast stroke, with medleys and team relays. The exceptions are the MS3 and MS4 categories, which don’t swim butterfly. There are ten lanes in total, each one measuring 2.5 metres in width. The expectations this year are enormous, as some big names are heading out to Rio. One of them is 21-year-old Brit…

Share.

Goalball has been one of the highlights of the Paralympic Games since 1976. The sport requires skill and an acute sense of touch. It is the brainchild of German Sepp Reindle and Austrian Hanz Lorenzen, who came up with the game in 1946, as a means of helping with the rehabilitation of war veterans. Significantly, it is not a simple adaptation of an already existing, conventional sport; it was designed exclusively for the visually impaired. The main aim is to score more goals than the opposition. There are three teams in each game, all of whom play at the same…

Share.

One of Rio’s most popular spots during the Olympics, the Olympic Boulevard – a revitalized port area in the city centre – will continue with its varied program during the Paralympics, from 7 to 18 September. Anyone looking for a different kind of adventure, with a stunning panoramic view of the centre of Rio, is invited to take a trip in an enormous hot air balloon, which will rise 150 metres above the city. The rides are free, and the balloon holds up to 15 passengers at a time, from 10am to 10pm. Hop on opposite the Candelária Church. For…

Share.

A huge hit during the Olympics, with cultural and gastronomic attractions, the Houses of Nations are already being missed in Rio. The good news though is that some of them will keep their doors open until the end of the Paralympics, from 7 to 18 September. Check out this list with dates, prices and where to find the houses which will be open: Japan When: 7 to 18 September, Noon to 8pm (except 17 September) Where: Cidade das Artes – Av. das Américas, 5300 – Barra da Tijuca. Price: Free entry Mexico When: until 15 September, Tuesday to Friday, 10am until 5:30pm…

Share.

The sporting party atmosphere is set to continue. Rio de Janeiro will keep hold of the world’s attention, from 7 to 18 September, as the Paralympic Games – the world’s biggest sporting event for disabled athletes – gets under way. The video on the Comitê Rio 2016 website, “O coração não tem limites” (The heart has no limits), gives us a sense of what to expect from the opening ceremony, with its combination of high energy and the noble message of the Games: “Differences do not separate us”. The main idea is to play with people’s senses, using optical illusions,…

Share.

A summer festival this Saturday at the London Olympic Park, on the eve of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games, will feature inclusive sports and attractions for the disabled. The Liberty Festival 2016, with support from London City Council and other entities such as the Embassy of Brazil in London, occurs on National Paralympic Day, and will include an orchestra performance, street dancers and a selection of other artists, including around 50 Brazilians and Brits with special needs. An inspiring and unmissable celebration! Click here for all you need to know. What: National Paralympic Day and Liberty Festival 2016 When: Saturday,…

Share.
1 2 3 4 7