Recipes

I love Italian caprese quiche made with almond flour, as opposed to normal white flour. Here we have a Brazilian classic that also avoids white flour and uses cassava instead. It is a cake that has an almost elastic consistency thanks to the sticky nature of cassava starch. Made with fresh coconut, it is the perfect complement to a rich Italian coffee. The recipe is super practical and delicious. If you want to try other Brazilian recipes or have any questions, get in touch via Instagram: @lucianaberry. Ingredients 1kg of peeled raw cassava  250g of freshly grated coconut (you can…

Share.

Made with Seabass, one of the tastiest fishes in Brazil, Moqueca is a delicious dish and very popular in the North East of Brazil Brazilian cuisine is defined by its distinct flavours and aromas. From north to south, each region of Brazil has its local preferences, some with more emphasis on meat, others on chicken and fish. In the case of tropical Bahia, the main dishes are Moqueca, vatapá and the famous acarajé (see glossary). Now, we will start with the recipe for a moqueca made with a typically common fish and coconut milk, with the option of using dendê…

Share.

Acarajé is one of the signature dishes of Brazil’s Northeast, and now you can try out this tasty delicacy by following this simple recipe Acarajé is one the most emblematic foods of Brazil’s Northeast. African in origin, it is fundamentally a patty made with beans, onion, salt and garlic, and then fried in dendê (palm) oil. It can be served with chillies, tomato sauce, vinaigrette or even shrimp, among other accompaniments. An interesting fact: acarajé is the ritual food of orixá Iansã, the ruler of the winds and storms in the Candomblé religion. In Africa, in the Yoruba language, àkàrà…

Share.

Typically Brazilian, pudim de leite (milk pudding) is a fairly easily made dessert Originated in colonial Brazil, thanks to a Portuguese abbot, who based his recipe on ‘Priscos pudding’, a Portuguese dessert made from pork lard, egg yolks, sugar and water. In the Brazilian version, the only ingredient that survived was the egg yolks. So let’s see the recipe! For the pudding, you’ll need 3 eggs, 1 tin of condensed milk and twice the quantity of normal milk. To make the syrup, use 1 teacup of sugar and ½ a teacup of water. Method You’ll need a specific…

Share.

Mocotó is a standout Brazilian dish that continues to win over new fans. Mocotó is another signature dish of Brazilian cuisine and one that is not dissimilar to feijoada. Mocotó means, quite literally, “paw of animal” and is a word that is derived from either “mukoto”, from the Quimbundo language, or “mbo-coto” from tupi. It might seem a little odd, but in fact this is precisely what the dish consists of: boiled cow’s feet served with various condiments. Alternatively the recipe can centre on some other limb or extremity, depending on the cook’s preference. A close relation to the fabled…

Share.

Curing is the oldest way of preserving food. Salt helps prolong the validity and freshness of meats, fish and vegetables, a practice very common in Brazil (dried meats) and Portugal (cod). Some processes may vary, but the common denominator is always salt. Here, I also use cachaça and sugar. This recipe most closely resembles what is known as Gravlax – a Scandinavian salmon that is cured in sugar and salt, and then served with dill. It’s delicious and super-easy to make. The only drawback is that it takes 48 hours to prepare, but it’s always great to have ready-to-eat salmon…

Share.

BRAZILIAN FOOD WEEK UK 2020 From Saturday 7 November to Saturday 14 November 2020   CALLING ALL FOOD AND GOURMET GASTRONOMY LOVERS! BBMag, your London-based bilingual Anglo-Brazilian publication, in association with the London Caipirinha Festival are pleased to launch a new challenge for you; the Brazilian Food Week UK 2020. During this challenging time of lockdown in the UK, some people might have more time working from home and can try some delicious Brazilian food. As from Saturday 7 November for one week until Saturday 14 November 2020, BBMag will be present you daily with some delightful Brazilian food recipes…

Share.

A super simple Brazilian recipe that’s easy to prepare. The tapioca crackers take a bit of patience, but they are well worth the wait. It’s also worth noting that I didn’t have to buy these ingredients in a specialist Brazilian retailer. These days it is increasingly easy to find foodstuffs from other cuisines, just hotfoot it down to any Asian or African markets or food halls and you’ll find it all. “Chuchu”, for example, is called “chow-chow” in Asian stores. The French call it chayote, and this is the most commonly accepted name in English. You can find tapioca pearls,…

Share.

My grandmother’s fillet steak withshitake and tomato sauce. This recipe is one of my favourites. My grandma “Vó Quinita” used to make it for us whenever we visited her in Salvador, after an eight-hour drive. The starter was always a prawn and potato salad, followed by her Malassado dish. It’s a very simple recipe to prepare. The most important things: first, don’t overcook the meat, and second, make sure the sauce is rich enough. I like to serve it with rice and/or potatoes. Ingredients 1 chateaubriand (around 300g to 350g) or 350g of fillet steak (Chateaubriand is the top…

Share.

This recipe is super-fast and comes exclusively from my Cordon Bleu school. There’s one type of dish that’s always guaranteed to keep you warm during the cold winter months: Soup! Everyone here in London, often on their way home from work, at some point stops and wonders what they’re going to cook for dinner? This is when laziness can get the better of us, and we end up buying some ready meal from the supermarket. Well, don’t! This recipe is delicious and super practical! Better still, it only takes 10 minutes to prepare! Whenever I do cooking demonstrations at…

Share.

Want to please a Brazilian? Cook shrimp. Want to please an Englishman? Cook meat. That’s what I’ve learned after 15 years of living in England. I am not a huge fan of filet mignon normally. It might be the most tender of cuts, but it lacks flavour. I personally prefer meat that’s off the bone and has a little fat. Bone, by the way, has actually become very popular. The most revered restaurants in the world now serve marrow as a delicacy. With champagne, oysters and scallops. Let’s get back a time when the only mouths hankering after marrow belonged…

Share.

Coxinha, the most popular snack in Brazil! Originally from São Paulo, coxinha (pronounced “ko-sheen-ya”), is a typically Brazilian snack, which as its name suggests (Coxinha meaning “little thigh” in Portuguese) has a shape similar to a chicken thigh. And for those who don’t like chicken, the choice of filling can be substituted for any other type of meat, such as corned beef. And here’s our recipe! Preparing the meat Ingredients: – 1 whole chicken – 1 whole chopped onion – Carrot – Celery – Green herbs (to taste) – Garlic (to taste) – Bay leaf (to taste) – Pepper (whichever…

Share.

Feijão Tropeiro, one of the most popular dishes in Brazil! Eggs, bacon, sausage and beans might seem like the perfect set of ingredients for a traditional English fry-up, but add a sprinkling of farofa (a Brazilian stuffing made with cassava flour) and some kale, and this recipe will instantly bring a little taste of Minas Gerais to your home, without you having to leave the kitchen. It’s a simple recipe and can be served with roast beef, chicken, fish, or indeed on its own. The secret is to have either a decent smoked sausage or chorizo. And given how easy…

Share.

Brazilian Gastronomy: What about a “tasty” regional tour of Brazil? Let us be your guide! With over 500 years of history, Brazilian cuisine is extremely diverse, the result of a great mix of ingredients, foods and traditions that date back to both to the indigenous native population and the migratory influences over the centuries. Even the “discovery” of Brazil relates to cooking given that the Portuguese caravels that landed in the country in 1500 were in fact in search of India and its spices. Today, every region of the country has its own gastronomic identity and each local cuisine has…

Share.

As well as being simple, these recipes are quick and tasty A common joke amongst Brazilians is to say “you won me through my stomach”, with reference to how a tasty meal can be a big step towards winning the favour of people you like or someone you want to impress, without wasting hours in the kitchen or running the risk of making mistakes. Many practical recipes can take the place of more complicated, refined dishes. We begin with the starter: this salad, always welcome at the table, holds its secret in its dressing. Salad Opt for greens that are…

Share.
1 2 3 4